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UCR in the News

UC Riverside taste test continues decades-long search for perfect avocado

The Press-Enterprise |
Students, faculty members, and researchers who participate in UCR's regular avocado tastings are not only tasked with rating the slices they try but also describing what they like best about them.
UCR in the News

Mojave Desert creates ideal climate for Laila Lalami’s story of immigrants

Los Angeles Times |
Los Angeles Times Book Club pick "The Other Americans," the latest novel from Laila Lalami, a professor of creative writing, is featured in an article about the book's rural Mojave Desert setting.  
UCR in the News

Want to keep your brain sharp in old age? Go back to school

NBC News |
New research from Rachel Wu, an assistant professor of psychology at UCR, shows the brain has the ability to function well — and even excel — in old age. The secret? Keep learning.
UCR in the News

Joshua trees are being wiped out by climate change

Gizmodo |
Climate change may kill off most of the trees in Joshua Tree National Park, according to a new UCR study.
UCR in the News

What happened when they told me, 'go back to your country'

CNN |
Professor Karthick Ramakrishnan delves into his personal history in an op-ed about how Americans can improve the national conversation on race and immigration.
UCR in the News

Susan Straight’s summer book picks transport readers beyond ‘beach reads’

Los Angeles Times |
The distinguished professor of creative writing discusses the summer reading of her past and her forthcoming memoir, "In the Country of Women."
UCR in the News

Five Scientific Findings That Could Lead to New Inventions

Smithsonian Magazine |
Research by Professor David Kisailus on mantis shrimp's impact-resistant armor is featured in a roundup of findings in the natural world that could inspire new inventions.
UCR in the News

UC Riverside ranks No. 2 among UC schools for first-generation freshmen

The Press-Enterprise |
Of freshman who enrolled at UCR in fall 2018, nearly 60 percent are trying to become the first in their family to complete a four-year degree. The national average of 36 percent.
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