UCR in the News

Death counts become the rhythm of the pandemic in the absence of national mourning

The Washington Post |
The Washington Post profiles Kim Yi Dionne, an assistant professor of political science, in a piece about the ritual of monitoring coronavirus death counts. 
UCR in the News

Camp Is Canceled. Three More Months of Family Time. Help.

The New York Times |
Kate Sweeny, a professor of psychology, discusses how accessing "flow," a state of total absorption in a project, can help people cope with confinement. 
UCR in the News

Why LA County's Unemployment Rate Is So Much Higher Than Most Of California's

LAist |
Economics professor Gloria Gonzalez-Rivera comments on Los Angeles County's unprecedented rate of unemployment due to the elimination of service-sector jobs in the wake of COVID-19. 
UCR in the News

Nonprofit Growth in Inland Empire at Risk Due to COVID-19

KVCR |
Karthick Ramakrishnan, a professor of public policy and political science, discusses the findings of a new report on regional nonprofits released by UCR's Center for Social Innovation. 
UCR in the News

Is There Any Safe Way to Socialize During the Coronavirus Pandemic?

Time |
Brandon Brown, an associate professor in the UCR School of Medicine, says with COVID-19 still a major health threat, the most responsible social visits are virtual ones. 
UCR in the News

‘New-agey types’ and pro-Trump activists. Anti-vaccine crusade finds new allies amid coronavirus

The Sacramento Bee |
Richard M. Carpiano, a professor of public policy and sociology, explains why different groups have converged to protest stay-at-home orders and other public health guidelines issued in the wake of COVID-19. 
UCR in the News

So You Had a Bad Day …

The New York Times |
Sonja Lyubomirsky, a distinguished professor of psychology, comments on the mood-boosting benefits of gratitude. 
UCR in the News

Why We Shouldn’t Quantify the COVID-19 Pandemic in Terms of 9/11

Truthout |
Matthew Byrne, a doctoral student in sociology, notes that comparing the tragedy of the COVID-19 pandemic to that of 9/11 "rarely achieves its intended aims."