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UCR in the News

How Inland Empire Cities Are Pushing Warehouses To Be Cleaner And Greener

LAist |
Juliann Emmons Allison, who studies the harms from warehouses, said some developers are hoping to pre-empt criticism of their warehouses by installing amenities such as air filtration systems in nearby San Bernardino County homes.
UCR in the News

The inadequacy of the term “Asian American”

Vox |
UCR's Karthick Ramakrishnan weighs in on a story about the wide-reaching term "Asian American," and allegations that it "flattens and erases entire cultures."
UCR in the News

Little known outside India, Jainism spreads at colleges amid calls to ‘decolonize’ studies

Los Angeles Times |
UCR faculty and students discuss Jainism, a little-known, millenniums-old Indian religious and philosophical tradition, as American Jain donors seeks to expand U.S. awareness of this ancient belief system through academia.
UCR in the News

Yes, lots of comics were racist. A new generation of Black artists is reinventing them

Los Angeles Times |
UCR faculty member and author-illustrator John Jennings discusses indie comics by Black artists, written for Black families about Black people, with a focus on tales of Africa before slavery.
UCR in the News

Environmental Engineers Use Corn Waste to Treat and Filter Water

The Spoon |
Engineers in the laboratory of Kandis Leslie Abdul-Aziz found a way to incorporate the waste from corn production and use it to filter and treat water.
UCR in the News

Which is better for developing immunity: COVID-19 vaccine or natural infection?

The Press Enterprise |
Brigham C. Willis, senior associate dean for medical education, is pleased by the results of a UC Irvine study showing the new mRNA vaccines are even better at protecting people from COVID-19 than having been previously infected.
UCR in the News

California’s ‘White Gold’ Rush: Lithium In Demand Amid Surge In Electric Vehicles

KVCR |
Electrical engineer Mihri Ozkan and geologist Michael McKibben discuss lithium, which is in such high demand globally that it’s now being called “white gold," and causing groundwater problems for farmers in some countries where it's being mined. 
UCR in the News

BTS, Travis Scott and more celebrities are providing some tasty pop to fast food menus

The Press Enterprise |
Ricky Rodriguez, associate professor of media and cultural studies, on the trend of pop stars collaborating with fast food chains on special meals.