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UCR in the News

College students struggle with mental health as pandemic drags on

Washington Post |
Jennifer Hung, assistant director of counseling and psychological services, talks about helping students manage their anxiety about coming back to campus.
UCR in the News

Grant Supports Study of New Catalyst Structures

Department of Energy |
Matthew P. Conley, an assistant professor of chemistry, has received a three-year grant of $500,000 from the Department of Energy.
UCR in the News

Chloroplasts do the darndest things

Knowable Magazine |
Katayoon Dehesh, a molecular biochemist and coauthor of an overview of plant organelle signaling in the Annual Review of Plant Biology, talks about the importance of chloroplasts and related plastids to most forms of life. 
UCR in the News

Warehouse jobs — recently thought of as jobs of the future — are suddenly jobs few workers want

Washington Post |
“Workers are exhausted, and they’re working very physical jobs,” said Ellen Reese, chair of labor studies at UCR. “Add in the long hours and quick pace of the holiday season, and that can lead to a lot of additional risks.”
UCR in the News

UC Riverside fundraising campaign aims to help Afghan scholars

The Press Enterprise |
Marko Princevac, interim vice provost of international affairs, and David Lloyd, distinguished professor of English, explain why this campaign is more than a humanitarian effort — it’s about promoting academic freedom.
UCR in the News

This trilobite was equipped with a 'hyper-eye' never seen before in the animal kingdom

LiveScience |
Nigel Hughes, paleontologist and trilobite expert, talks about the difficulty of trying to learn about the function of ancient animals' body parts through fossils.
UCR in the News

Revenge of the Silent (Vaccinated) Majority

US News and World Report |
Richard Carpiano, a UCR public health scientist and sociologist, believes the "silent majority" of Americans who are pro-vaccine and want the pandemic to end will prevail over the vocal minority who refuse to wear masks or get vaccines.
UCR in the News

How Gratitude Can Help Your Financial Life

Nasdaq |
While sadness can increase feelings of “economic impatience” — the desire for a smaller cash award now over a larger one in the future — gratitude has the opposite effect, helping people to delay gratification, according to a 2014 study including researchers from Northeastern University, Harvard and UCR.