October 21, 2021

Experts on earthquakes

Author: UCR News
October 21, 2021

 

For fast access to experts, TEXT or call the 24-hour-experts hotline at 951-312-3049, or email news@ucr.edu 

Earthquakes

 

Nicolas Barth: Assistant professor of geology. Barth is an expert on the surface expression of active faults and related landscape hazards like landslides and sedimentation. He has particular expertise on fault systems in California and New Zealand. He works out the timing of past earthquakes, long term rates of fault slip, and rates of uplift. nic.barth@ucr.edu

Roby Douilly: Assistant professor of seismology. Douilly is an expert on earthquake ground shaking and its effects. He uses earthquakes to image fault systems at depth, models rupture of past earthquakes to understand earthquake properties, and models earthquake scenarios to inform potential future earthquake events. He has particular expertise in southern California and Haiti. roby.douilly@ucr.edu

Gareth Funning: Associate professor of seismology. Funning studies deformation of the crust from earthquakes and slow-moving (i.e. creeping) faults using satellite radar and high-precision GPS (i.e. geodesy). He also works to pair results from satellites with seismic observations. He has broad global expertise in tectonics and field experience in California. gareth.funning@ucr.edu

Abhijit Ghosh: Associate professor of geophysics. Ghosh observes a wide-range of fault slip speeds from earthquakes to slow movements. He is particularly knowledgeable about slow slip and tremor, important processes in Oregon/Washington and elsewhere. His field expertise includes California, Cascadia, Alaska, and Himalayas. abhijit.ghosh@ucr.edu

David Oglesby: Professor of geophysics. Oglesby is interested in studying the physics of earthquakes, and investigating what makes some earthquakes so large and damaging. He performs computer simulations of recorded earthquakes to understand earthquake properties, and also simulations of earthquake scenarios to inform about potential future earthquake events. He is also interested in the generation of strong ground motion and tsunamis. david.oglesby@ucr.edu