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College of Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences Latest News

UCR alumna’s story on rapper Nipsey Hussle results in Emmy nomination

The Fox 11 reporter’s profile ran four months before the artist’s murder.

The trip of an after-lifetime?

UCR's John Martin Fischer examines near-death experiences through a philosophical lens

Two grad students win nearly $100,000 in fellowship awards

First-generation college students in sociology and education received the Ford Foundation awards to support their research

Agreement propels anthropological opportunities for UCR researchers, students in Mexico

Memorandum of understanding strengthens the relationship between UCR’s anthropology department and Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History

Pushing back against poverty

Mark Sebarrotin said UCR was his shot at the California dream; now, he wants to help others achieve their dream, too.
By Tess Eyrich | | Students

Dual exhibitions from photographer John Divola examine social identity and the sublime

“STRATUM” and “Clive Wearing’s Dilemma” are on view at the California Museum of Photography May 11-Sept. 8
By Jessica Weber | | Arts / Culture

Meet the women who battled tuberculosis in Indian country

In his latest book, a scholar of Native American history explores a little-known collaboration that made big impacts

The enduring power of art as activism in “Emory Douglas: Bold Visual Language”

Although the Black Panther Party dissolved nearly 40 years ago, the movement’s legacy endures — largely through the iconic imagery created by former party member Emory Douglas. As the minister of culture for the Black Panther Party and graphic artist for the organization’s newspaper, Douglas was charged with establishing the...
By Jessica Weber | | Arts / Culture

This UCR historian once trained horses; now she studies them

Doctoral student Katrin Boniface turns a lifelong passion into research for a growing field: equine history
By Tess Eyrich | | Students

New movie aims to foster change in a broken system

“I Am Somebody’s Child,” a film based on UCR alumna Regina Louise’s memoir about growing up in foster care, premieres April 20 on Lifetime
By Jessica Weber | | Arts / Culture

Join UCR faculty and alumni at the LA Times Festival of Books

Attend panel discussions and book signings featuring UCR writers at the USC campus April 13-14.
By Jessica Weber | | Arts / Culture

Being ‘Other’ in America

When Nora Guerraoui receives word her father has been killed in an apparent hit-and-run, she is forced to return to the small California desert town she left behind and contend with the many memories she’s tried to forget. So sets the stage of “ The Other Americans ,” the latest...
By Jessica Weber | | Arts / Culture

Small slice of the American pie, big impact

An oral history project archives the experiences and contributions of more than 50 notable Korean Americans and counting
By Tess Eyrich | | Arts / Culture

What’s in your drinking water?

Carl Cranor wants you to know — and to empower you to do something about it
By Tess Eyrich | | Social Science / Education

Veterans history project receives VA funding through 2020

Federal funding will enable thousands more Inland Empire K-12 students to join in documenting the histories of those interred at Riverside National Cemetery
By Tess Eyrich | | Arts / Culture

Leaving it all to chance

Douglas McCulloh is not a man ruled by fate, but rather, chance. In fact, McCulloh, who joined UCR ARTS as the new senior curator for the California Museum of Photography , or CMP, in July has made chance his primary modus operandi. He traces his preoccupation with chance back to...
By Jessica Weber | | Arts / Culture

Alumna brings music history to life for the next generation

The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame has a new director of curatorial affairs: UCR’s Nwaka Onwusa ’08
By Tess Eyrich | | Students

Female presidents are held to higher standards than males

An analysis of presidential approval ratings reveals truths about gender biases
By Tess Eyrich | | Social Science / Education

Confronting loss and loneliness in “If You Have to Go”

Loneliness, while inherently isolating, is also a universal experience. This dichotomy lies at the heart of poet Katie Ford’s newest collection, “ If You Have to Go .” Dominated by a crown of 39 sonnets — each linked by the repetition of the last line of a poem as the...
By Jessica Weber | | Arts / Culture

In higher education, the positives outweigh the negatives

A UC Riverside sociologist’s 35-year survey of American universities offers evidence of surprises and successes
By Tess Eyrich | | Social Science / Education
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