How giant-faced owls snag voles hidden in snow 

Great gray owls’ physical features, especially parts of their wings and face, help them correct for sonic distortions caused by snow, enabling them to find moving food with astonishing accuracy, according to a new UC Riverside study.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Earth might be experiencing 7th mass extinction, not 6th

New research suggests environmental changes caused the first mass extinction event in history, which occurred millions of years earlier than scientists previously realized.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Injections for diabetes, cancer could become unnecessary

Researchers at UC Riverside are paving the way for diabetes and cancer patients to forget needles and injections, and instead take pills to manage their conditions.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

The unintended consequences of using a ventilator

Breakthrough research addresses a long-standing question in pulmonary medicine about whether modern ventilators overstretch lung tissue. They do.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Discovery could dramatically narrow search for space creatures

An Earth-like planet orbiting an M dwarf — the most common type of star in the universe — appears to have no atmosphere at all. This discovery could cause a major shift in the search for life on other planets.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Broccoli gas: a better way to find life in space 

Broccoli, along with other plants and microorganisms, emit gases to help them expel toxins. Scientists believe these gases could provide compelling evidence of life on other planets.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Why the Salton Sea is turning into toxic dust

The Salton Sea, California’s most polluted inland lake, has lost a third of its water in the last 25 years. New research has determined a decline in Colorado River flow is the reason for that shrinking.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

195 ways to help California’s painted ladies

By documenting hundreds of new nectar plants for painted ladies, scientists have renewed hope these charismatic butterflies may prove resilient to climate change.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Laughing gas in space could mean life

Scientists at UC Riverside are suggesting something is missing from the typical roster of chemicals that astrobiologists use to search for life on planets around other stars — laughing gas.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

After wildfires, do microbes exhale potent greenhouse gas?

Laughing gas is no laughing matter — nitrous oxide is a greenhouse gas with 300 times the warming potential of carbon dioxide. Scientists are racing to learn whether microorganisms send more of it into the atmosphere after wildfires.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Massive Mexican earthquakes warn Southern Californians 

A pair of massive earthquakes in Mexico has some in Southern California on edge, wondering whether the Golden State is next. UC Riverside seismologist Abhijit Ghosh weighs in on the likelihood of more shakers, and how to prepare for them.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Robot sleeves for kids with cerebral palsy

UC Riverside engineers are developing low-cost, robotic “clothing” to help children with cerebral palsy gain control over their arm movements.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

The no-tech way to preserve California’s state grass

Though it is disappearing, California’s official state grass has the ability to live for 100 years or more. New research demonstrates that sheep and cattle can help it achieve that longevity.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Chemical cocktail in skin summons disease-spreading mosquitoes

A UC Riverside-led team discovered the exact chemical combination that causes Zika, dengue and yellow fever-spreading mosquitoes to locate and land on their victims.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Mexican mangroves have been capturing carbon for 5,000 years

Researchers have identified a new reason to protect mangrove forests: they’ve been quietly keeping carbon out of Earth’s atmosphere for the past 5,000 years.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Could more of Earth’s surface host life?

Of all known planets, Earth is as friendly to life as any planet could possibly be — or is it? If Jupiter’s orbit changes, a new study shows Earth could be more hospitable than it is today. When a planet has a perfectly circular orbit around its star, the distance...

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

The scent that could save California’s avocados

UC Riverside scientists are on the hunt for a chemical that disrupts “evil” weevils’ mating and could prevent them from destroying California’s supply of avocados.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Sleeping giant could end deep ocean life 

A previously overlooked factor — the position of continents — helps fill Earth’s oceans with life-supporting oxygen. Continental movement could ultimately have the opposite effect, killing most deep ocean creatures. “Continental drift seems so slow, like nothing drastic could come from it, but when the ocean is primed, even a...

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Cousin of crop-killing bacteria mutating rapidly

A bacterial species closely related to deadly citrus greening disease is rapidly evolving its ability to infect insect hosts, and possibly plants as well.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Drought increases microbe-laden dust landing in Sierras

Dust from all over the world is landing in the Sierra Nevada mountains carrying microbes that are toxic to both plants and humans. Research from UC Riverside shows higher concentrations of the dust are landing at lower elevations, where people are more likely to be hiking.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology