New strategies to save the world’s most indispensable grain 

A UC Riverside-led team has learned what happens to the roots of rice plants when they’re confronted with two types of stressful scenarios: too much water, or too little. These observations form the basis of new protective strategies.

Remembering ‘isotope queen’ Marilyn Fogel, pioneering scientist, beloved mentor 

Marilyn Fogel, endowed geoecology professor at UC Riverside, died on May 11 in Mariposa, Calif. She was 69. She pioneered the use of isotopes to understand the life history of organisms, both modern and ancient. In so doing, she helped develop biogeochemistry as a new field of science and earned...

By Jules Bernstein | | University

New technology offers fighting chance against grapevine killer

Scientists at UC Riverside have a shot at eradicating a deadly threat to vineyards posed by the glassy-winged sharpshooter, just as its resistance to insecticide has been growing.

Meet the forest microbes that can survive megafires

New UC Riverside research shows fungi and bacteria able to survive redwood tanoak forest megafires are microbial “cousins” that often increase in abundance after feeling the flames.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Lesser known ozone layer’s outsized role in planet warming

New UC Riverside-led research has identified a lesser-known form of ozone playing a big role in heating the Southern Ocean — one of Earth’s main cooling systems.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

To mask, or not to mask?

To gauge whether scientists agree with popular sentiment around mask wearing, we check in here with three UC Riverside virologists and epidemiologists.

By Jules Bernstein | | Health

Why Venus rotates, slowly, despite sun’s powerful grip

If not for the soupy, fast-moving atmosphere on Venus, Earth’s sister planet would likely not rotate. Instead, Venus would be locked in place, always facing the sun the way the same side of the moon always faces Earth. The gravity of a large object in space can keep a smaller...

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

With dwindling water supplies, the timing of rainfall matters 

A new UC Riverside study shows it’s not how much extra water you give your plants, but when you give it that counts.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

How mountain streams signal climate change

A new tool designed by UC Riverside researchers can better assess an overlooked indicator of global warming: the variety of bugs, worms, and snails living in high mountain streams.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

UC Riverside hunts for COVID-19 variants in California

Genetic analysis of COVID-19 samples at UC Riverside is helping state officials prepare for potential infection surges caused by new variants of the disease.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Why doesn’t fire kill some bacteria and fungi?

UC Riverside scientists will spend the next three years studying the traits that allow soil microbes to respond to fire, as well as the role those microbes play in storing or emitting powerful greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide or nitrous oxide.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

No Thanksgiving for bacteria or fungus

UC Riverside scientists have developed a technique for solving a decades-old mystery involving the chemical in turkey that makes people sleepy. Their new ability to map the atoms involved in the production of tryptophan opens the door to new antibiotic and antifungal drugs.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Following rain, desert microbes exhale potent greenhouse gas

New UC Riverside research shows how, after it rains, microbes in desert soil convert one form of pollution into another — laughing gas.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

From the streets to the stratosphere: clean driving technology enables cleaner rocket fuel

A chemical used in electric vehicle batteries could also give us carbon-free fuel for space flight, according to new UC Riverside research.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Can the Salton Sea geothermal field prevent the coming lithium shortage?

University of California, Riverside scientists will join a first-of-its-kind effort to map out California’s so-called “Lithium Valley,” and learn whether it can meet America’s urgent demand for lithium in a sustainable, environmentally friendly way.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Who’s responsible for roadside rubbish?

New UC Riverside research reveals that items in litter typically originate less than two miles from where they’re found — and unless humans remove them, most of these items will never leave the environment.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

New research bites holes into theories about Megalodons

A new study leaves large tooth marks in previous conclusions about the body shape of the Megalodon, one of the largest sharks that ever lived.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Human gut bacteria have sex to share vitamin B12

Your gut bacteria need vitamin B12 just as much as you do. Though DNA is usually passed from parent to child, new research shows gut bacteria transfer genes through “sex” in order to take their vitamins.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Cleaning your car may not protect you from this carcinogen

It is unlikely that a cancer-causing chemical inside your car can be dusted or wiped way, according to new UC Riverside research.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Black eyed peas could help eliminate need for fertilizer

Black eyed peas’ ability to attract beneficial bacteria isn’t diminished by modern farming practices, new UC Riverside research shows. Planting it in rotation with other crops could help growers avoid the need for costly, environmentally damaging fertilizers.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology