Content Authored by: Jules Bernstein

Chemical discovery gets reluctant seeds to sprout

Seeds that would otherwise lie dormant will spring to life with the aid of a new chemical discovered by a UC Riverside-led team.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Grow and eat your own vaccines?

The future of vaccines may look more like eating a salad than getting a shot in the arm. UC Riverside scientists are studying whether they can turn edible plants like lettuce into mRNA vaccine factories.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Hummingbirds can smell their way out of danger

In less time than it takes to read this sentence, hummingbirds can catch a whiff of potential trouble. That’s the result of new UC Riverside research showing, contrary to popular belief, the tiny birds do have an active sense of smell.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Sending kids back to school: is it too soon?

After more than a year of lockdown, school is back in session. But many people are wondering whether it should be. Here, UC Riverside experts in viruses, medical policy and education share their thoughts about whether in-person learning at this moment in time is an A+ idea, and offer ideas...

By Jules Bernstein | | Students, Health

Salton Sea restoration efforts could fail without science

There are finally efforts under way to improve the environmental health disaster that is the Salton Sea — California’s largest and most polluted lake. However, a group of UC Riverside scientists, engineers, medical experts, and economists has published a new report warning that without science, these efforts may not succeed.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Study shows common insecticide is harmful in any amount

A new UC Riverside study shows that a type of insecticide made for commercial plant nurseries is harmful to a typical bee even when applied well below the label rate.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Managing earthquakes triggered by oil production

A team of scientists has developed an approach to disposing wastewater that reduces the danger of triggering an earthquake.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Making freshman calculus add up for more students

UC Riverside is leading a new, $1.26 million project to bring calculus classes to life for students who are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and math subjects.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Better predicting how plants and animals will weather climate extremes

A team of scientists led by UC Riverside has devised a more accurate way to predict the effects of climate change on plants and animals — and whether some will survive at all.

Geckos might lose their tails, but not their dinner

A new UC Riverside study finds geckos are fierce hunters whether or not their tails are attached to their bodies.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Decoded genome of little-known disease offers hope for citrus

UC Riverside scientists are hoping the RNA of an obscure infection can one day be used like a Trojan horse to deliver life-saving treatments to citrus trees.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

UCR joins forces with NASA on missions to Venus

By joining NASA on their newly announced missions, UC Riverside is hoping to learn how Venus went from pleasant, Earth-like planet to blistering wasteland.

$3 million grant aims to prolong life for dialysis patients

The five-year survival rate for people on dialysis is under 50 percent. University of California researchers are hoping to improve that prognosis. When kidneys fail, the body is unable to rid itself of toxins, waste products, and excessive fluids. Dialysis or transplants are the only treatments for the 786,000 people...

Project illuminates where giant exoplanets reside 

Astronomers have long wondered whether the configuration of planets in our solar system is common elsewhere in the universe. New results from the longest-running survey of exoplanets helps answer this question.

Discovery increases likelihood of growing food despite drought 

University of California scientists have discovered genetic data that will help food crops like tomatoes and rice survive longer, more intense periods of drought on our warming planet.

Cicada explosion mystifies insect experts

Doug Yanega, senior scientist at UC Riverside’s Entomology Research Museum, discusses one of nature's unsolved mysteries: the 17-year life cycle of cicadas in the Eastern U.S.

Chemical ‘nose’ sniffs critical differences in DNA structures

Small changes in the structure of DNA have been implicated in breast cancer and other diseases, but they’ve been extremely difficult to detect — until now. Using what they describe as a “chemical nose,” UC Riverside chemists are able to “smell” when bits of DNA are folded in unusual ways.

$1 million project helps tribal nations adapt to climate change

UC Riverside ecologists are leading a $1 million plant protection project that will help Southern California’s tribal nations adapt to climate change.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

UCR ecologist on geoengineering: a new solution to the climate crisis

As many gather for Earth Day 2021, A UC Riverside ecologist urges caution toward solar geoengineering, an increasingly popular solution to the climate crisis.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Study reveals the workings of nature’s own earthquake blocker

A new UC Riverside study finds a naturally occurring “earthquake gate” that decides which earthquakes are allowed to grow into magnitude 8 or greater.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology