Sleeping giant could end deep ocean life 

A previously overlooked factor — the position of continents — helps fill Earth’s oceans with life-supporting oxygen. Continental movement could ultimately have the opposite effect, killing most deep ocean creatures. “Continental drift seems so slow, like nothing drastic could come from it, but when the ocean is primed, even a...

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Cousin of crop-killing bacteria mutating rapidly

A bacterial species closely related to deadly citrus greening disease is rapidly evolving its ability to infect insect hosts, and possibly plants as well.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Drought increases microbe-laden dust landing in Sierras

Dust from all over the world is landing in the Sierra Nevada mountains carrying microbes that are toxic to both plants and humans. Research from UC Riverside shows higher concentrations of the dust are landing at lower elevations, where people are more likely to be hiking.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

The chemical controlling life and death in hair follicles

A single chemical is key to controlling when hair follicle cells divide, and when they die. This discovery could not only treat baldness, but ultimately speed wound healing because follicles are a source of stem cells.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Why Jupiter doesn’t have rings like Saturn

Because it’s bigger, Jupiter ought to have larger, more spectacular rings than Saturn has. But new UC Riverside research shows Jupiter’s massive moons prevent that vision from lighting up the night sky.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

How stressed-out plants produce their own aspirin 

Plants protect themselves from environmental hazards by producing salicylic acid, also known as aspirin. A new understanding of this process may help plants survive climate change.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Ancient microbes may help us find extraterrestrial life forms

Using light-capturing proteins in living microbes, UC Riverside scientists helped reconstruct what life was like for some of Earth’s earliest organisms. These efforts could help us one day recognize signs of life on other planets.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Plant stress transformed into rapid tests for dangerous chemicals

UC Riverside scientists have modified proteins involved in plants’ natural response to stress, making them the basis of innovative tests for banned pesticides and deadly, synthetic cannabinoids.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Scientists fail to locate once-common CA bumble bees

Several species of California bumble bees have gone missing in the first statewide census of the fuzzy pollinators in 40 years. If they can be found, a recent court ruling could help save them.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Genetic discovery could spell mosquitoes’ death knell

A UC Riverside genetic discovery could turn disease-carrying mosquitoes into insect Peter Pans, preventing them from ever maturing or multiplying.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

You, too, can grow California’s oldest living orange variety

The 1000th tree okayed for growing by California’s Citrus Clonal Protection Program happens to be the oldest living orange variety in the state.

Antibiotics wreak havoc on athletic performance

By killing essential gut bacteria, antibiotics ravage athletes’ motivation and endurance. The UC Riverside-led mouse study suggests the microbiome is a big factor separating athletes from couch potatoes.

Pheromones lure deadly palm weevils to their doom

UC Riverside scientists have a new chemical weapon to seduce and kill the invasive, long-nosed beetles destroying California palm trees by the tens of thousands.

New strategies to save the world’s most indispensable grain 

A UC Riverside-led team has learned what happens to the roots of rice plants when they’re confronted with two types of stressful scenarios: too much water, or too little. These observations form the basis of new protective strategies.

Remembering ‘isotope queen’ Marilyn Fogel, pioneering scientist, beloved mentor 

Marilyn Fogel, endowed geoecology professor at UC Riverside, died on May 11 in Mariposa, Calif. She was 69. She pioneered the use of isotopes to understand the life history of organisms, both modern and ancient. In so doing, she helped develop biogeochemistry as a new field of science and earned...

By Jules Bernstein | | University

New technology offers fighting chance against grapevine killer

Scientists at UC Riverside have a shot at eradicating a deadly threat to vineyards posed by the glassy-winged sharpshooter, just as its resistance to insecticide has been growing.

Meet the forest microbes that can survive megafires

New UC Riverside research shows fungi and bacteria able to survive redwood tanoak forest megafires are microbial “cousins” that often increase in abundance after feeling the flames.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Lesser known ozone layer’s outsized role in planet warming

New UC Riverside-led research has identified a lesser-known form of ozone playing a big role in heating the Southern Ocean — one of Earth’s main cooling systems.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

To mask, or not to mask?

To gauge whether scientists agree with popular sentiment around mask wearing, we check in here with three UC Riverside virologists and epidemiologists.

By Jules Bernstein | | Health

Why Venus rotates, slowly, despite sun’s powerful grip

If not for the soupy, fast-moving atmosphere on Venus, Earth’s sister planet would likely not rotate. Instead, Venus would be locked in place, always facing the sun the way the same side of the moon always faces Earth. The gravity of a large object in space can keep a smaller...

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology