The no-tech way to preserve California’s state grass

Though it is disappearing, California’s official state grass has the ability to live for 100 years or more. New research demonstrates that sheep and cattle can help it achieve that longevity.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Mexican mangroves have been capturing carbon for 5,000 years

Researchers have identified a new reason to protect mangrove forests: they’ve been quietly keeping carbon out of Earth’s atmosphere for the past 5,000 years.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Back to School: UCR Welcome Week 2022

All UCR Highlanders are invited to celebrate the start of our 2022-23 academic year with a bunch of fun and informative events hosted by various campus partners. This is a great time to discover new departments, reconnect with familiar programs, and add friends to your list of followers and followees...

By Malinn Loeung | | Students, University

U.S. News names UCR No. 1 public for social mobility

UC Riverside is the top public university in the U.S. for social mobility, according to the just-released 2022-23 U.S. News & World Report college rankings.

By J.D. Warren | | University

Could more of Earth’s surface host life?

Of all known planets, Earth is as friendly to life as any planet could possibly be — or is it? If Jupiter’s orbit changes, a new study shows Earth could be more hospitable than it is today. When a planet has a perfectly circular orbit around its star, the distance...

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

UCR, Inland Empire receive $18 million grant

UC Riverside and the Inland Empire have received $18 million from a statewide investment of $250 million that will establish K-16 Education Collaboratives to address equity gaps and improve education-to-career pipelines in each region of the state. The Inland Empire award was announced Aug. 25 by California Gov. Gavin Newsom...

By UCR News | | University

A shot in the arm

UC Riverside experts answer questions on Americans needing just one COVID-19 booster vaccine each year

By Iqbal Pittalwala | | Health

'The Most Important World Leader Since World War II'

Mikhail Gorbachev is the man whose actions inserted the terms perestroika and glasnost into the international vernacular. In 1985, Mikhail Gorbachev became the leader of the Soviet Union, presiding over a remarkable five-year span during which until-then unimaginable democratic reforms were instituted, the Berlin Wall fell, communism was virtually wiped...

By J.D. Warren | | Social Science / Education

Family secret inspires new novel by UC Riverside’s Kate Anger

A story about coming-of-age, betrayal, and revenge, ‘The Shinnery’ is inspired by the author’s family history and a trial that shook 1890s Texas.

By Sandra Baltazar Martínez | | Arts / Culture

Student Freedom Initiative adds UCR to its next cohort of member institutions

Today, Student Freedom Initiative announced the next round of Minority Serving Institutions, or MSIs, that will participate in its program. UC Riverside, ranked No. 1 in the U.S. for social mobility by U.S. News and World Report, was one of the universities selected. The addition of 14 institutions increases the...

By UCR News | | University, Students

UCR ranked No. 23 among best value colleges in new college guide

UC Riverside is ranked high for financial aid, making an impact, and value in the Princeton Review’s “Best 388 Colleges for 2023.” The lists are based on the Princeton Review’s survey of 160,000 students attending the 388 colleges and universities profiled. They appear in the 2023 edition of the annual...

By Imran Ghori | | University

UC Riverside and UC Davis help create program targeted for students who didn’t finish college

More than $4.85 million in state funds will allow these campuses to reengage with former UC students and California residents with some college and no degree attainment.

By Sandra Baltazar Martínez | | University

Sleeping giant could end deep ocean life 

A previously overlooked factor — the position of continents — helps fill Earth’s oceans with life-supporting oxygen. Continental movement could ultimately have the opposite effect, killing most deep ocean creatures. “Continental drift seems so slow, like nothing drastic could come from it, but when the ocean is primed, even a...

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Monkeypox explained

UC Riverside experts discuss disease symptoms, vaccines, and anxiety management

By Iqbal Pittalwala | | Health

Drought increases microbe-laden dust landing in Sierras

Dust from all over the world is landing in the Sierra Nevada mountains carrying microbes that are toxic to both plants and humans. Research from UC Riverside shows higher concentrations of the dust are landing at lower elevations, where people are more likely to be hiking.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Coolants in Puff electronic cigarettes present health hazard

UC Riverside-led study highlights need for regulation to protect public health

By Iqbal Pittalwala | | Health

Regents approve plans for new School of Business building

The Regents of the University of California have approved construction plans for a new UC Riverside School of Business building that will provide more instructional and administrative space to meet growing enrollment demand. The vote, which took place July 20, allows the campus to move forward with construction this fall...

By Imran Ghori | | University

New dean of School of Education named

Joi Spencer has been named the dean of UC Riverside’s School of Education, effective Jan. 1, 2023. Spencer is a professor of Mathematics Education at the University of San Diego, in the School of Leadership and Education Sciences, or SOLES. During 16 years at USD, Spencer has been associate dean...

The chemical controlling life and death in hair follicles

A single chemical is key to controlling when hair follicle cells divide, and when they die. This discovery could not only treat baldness, but ultimately speed wound healing because follicles are a source of stem cells.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Why Jupiter doesn’t have rings like Saturn

Because it’s bigger, Jupiter ought to have larger, more spectacular rings than Saturn has. But new UC Riverside research shows Jupiter’s massive moons prevent that vision from lighting up the night sky.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology