Content Tagged with: Department of Botany and Plant Sciences

Chemical discovery gets reluctant seeds to sprout

Seeds that would otherwise lie dormant will spring to life with the aid of a new chemical discovered by a UC Riverside-led team.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Grow and eat your own vaccines?

The future of vaccines may look more like eating a salad than getting a shot in the arm. UC Riverside scientists are studying whether they can turn edible plants like lettuce into mRNA vaccine factories.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

$1 million project helps tribal nations adapt to climate change

UC Riverside ecologists are leading a $1 million plant protection project that will help Southern California’s tribal nations adapt to climate change.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

UCR ecologist on geoengineering: a new solution to the climate crisis

As many gather for Earth Day 2021, A UC Riverside ecologist urges caution toward solar geoengineering, an increasingly popular solution to the climate crisis.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Discovery is key to creating heat-tolerant crops

By 2050 global warming could reduce crop yields by one-third. UC Riverside researchers have identified a gene that could put the genie back in the bottle.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

$1.7 million grant to unlock barley’s genetic superpowers

Barley is important for more than beer. A UC Riverside geneticist has won $1.7 million to study how one of the world’s staple foods might survive climate change.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Parasitic plants conspire to keep hosts alive

The plant that encourages kissing at Christmas is in fact a parasite, and new research reveals mistletoe has an unusual feeding strategy. When two mistletoes invade the same tree, they increase photosynthesis to get the nutrients they need, essentially sharing the tree and causing it less harm.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

The first human settlers on islands caused extinctions

Though some believe prehistoric humans lived in harmony with nature, a new UC Riverside analysis of fossils shows human arrival in the Bahamas caused some birds to be lost from the islands and other species to be completely wiped out.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

New book explains DNA for curious nonscientists

After 50 years of research, UC Riverside geneticist Alan McHughen knows what DNA can and can't do. Now, he's written a book so that the rest of us can understand too. He couldn’t foresee when he wrote the book that the topic would gain additional importance with the outbreak of...

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Scientists unlock genetic secrets of wine growers’ worst enemy

Following a decade-long effort, scientists have mapped out the genome of an aphid-like pest capable of decimating vineyards. In so doing, they have discovered how it spreads — and potentially how to stop it. The research team’s work on the genome was published this past week in a BMC Biology...

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Biologists unravel tangled mystery of plant cell growth

When cells don’t divide into proper copies of themselves, living things fail to grow as they should. For the first time, scientists now understand how a protein called TANGLED1 can lead to accurate cell division in plants. Inside cells are structures called microtubules, which act like highways for moving proteins...

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

UCR Herbarium founder donates $900K to preserve its future

UC Riverside’s herbarium, established over 60 years ago, is an irreplaceable library of plant specimens. Now, a $900,000 bequest from its founder Frank Vasek and his wife Maxine will ensure the resource remains available to many generations of future plant scientists, and that it receives needed repairs and reorganization. Vasek...

By Jules Bernstein | | University

Early humans thrived in this drowned South African landscape

The Paleo-Agulhas Plain had diverse, verdant ecosystems and abundant game

By Holly Ober | | Science / Technology

Study identifies new temperature sensing mechanism in plants

Phytochrome foci have different behaviors at different temperatures and types of light

By Holly Ober | | Science / Technology

Research identifies possible on/off switch for plant growth

New research from UC Riverside identifies a protein that controls plant growth — good news for an era in which crops can get crushed by climate change.

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Game changer: New chemical keeps plants plump

A UC Riverside-led team has created a chemical to help plants hold onto water, which could stem the tide of massive annual crop losses from drought and help farmers grow food despite a changing climate. “Drought is the No. 1 cause, closely tied with flooding, of annual crop failures worldwide,”...

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Scientists decode DNA secrets of world’s toughest bean

UCR scientists have decoded the genome of black-eyed peas, offering hope for feeding Earth's expanding population, especially as the climate changes.

It’s not easy being green

Despite how essential plants are for life on Earth, little is known about how parts of plant cells orchestrate growth and greening. By creating mutant plants, UC Riverside researchers have uncovered a cellular communication pathway sought by scientists for decades. Both plants and humans have specialized light-sensitive proteins. In humans...

By Jules Bernstein | | Science / Technology

Scientists identify how plants sense temperature

When it gets hot outside, humans and animals have the luxury of seeking shelter in the shade or cool, air-conditioned buildings. But plants are stuck. While not immune to changing climate, plants respond to the rising mercury in different ways. Temperature affects the distribution of plants around the planet. It...

By Stacy Kish | | Science / Technology

Book taps into the racier aspects of plant sex

Now that UC Riverside professor Norman Ellstrand has your attention, he’d like to teach you about genetics

By Madeline Adamo | | Science / Technology